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HOPEVOL: Fitting hospice care

  • Start:  1 October 2017
  • Status: ongoing

The ZonMw-funded nationwide project HOPEVOL started in 2017. HOPEVOL stands for HOspicezorg die Passend is en de Eigen wens van mensen in de palliatieve terminale fase VOLgt (‘hospice care that is fitting and remains responsive to the personal wishes of people in the palliative terminal phase’).

Description

As the title of the project indicates, this study investigates what (the quality of) hospice care should be like in the opinion of the care receivers. By care receivers we mean people who (could) use hospice care as well as their relatives. The emphasis is on gaining a better view of the people who stay and stayed in hospices, what their care needs are, and how the care is and was attuned to those needs.


The goal of the analysis is to make the invisible visible and discussable, as the basis for selecting quality criteria for hospice care. The implementation of the criteria is the responsibility of the (umbrella) organisations involved in the project. The project result in 2020 should be a recommendation and implementation plan for the design and arrangement of hospice care in the future.

Researchers

Prof. Saskia Teunissen (UMCU)

Dr. Everlien de Graaf (UMCU)

Dr. Frederieke van der Baan (UMCU)

Prof. Carlo Leget

Partners

The HOPEVOL project was initiated by Septet: the consortium of palliative care in the central Netherlands. Septet is a collaborative venture involving the Expertise Centre Palliative Care (UMC Utrecht and the University of Humanistic Studies), seven networks of palliative care, and the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (Integraal Kankercentrum Nederland, IKNL).

(Co-)financing

This project is funded by ZonMw, as part of the programme Palliantie Meer dan zorg (Palliative Care: More than Care).

Also see

Contact

Prof Carlo Leget, C.Leget@UvH.nl.

This study investigates what (the quality of) hospice care should be like in the opinion of the care receivers. The goal of the analysis is to make the invisible visible and discussable, as the basis for selecting quality criteria for hospice care.